Tannice’s Covid-19 Birth Story

‘May you live in Interesting Times’, so the ancient curse goes. This year has been full of twists and turns, and if you’re pregnant, it comes with added anxiety about what that will be like. Will you be able to give birth where you want, with whom you want to support you? Usually I try to give advice that’s applicable on a national scale – but at the moment, with seemingly each NHS Trust making up their own rules as they go along, and those rules changing frequently, it’s impossible to know what the situation is on an individual level. So what I have done is focus on publishing individual experiences as a clue to what may be possible right now, and how other people have approached and experienced birthing in a time of Covid. This is an excerpt of Tannice’s Covid-19 Birth Story, published with permission. You can read the full version here.

Tannice's first child with her third on the day of his birth - a Covid-19 Birth Story
My first child with my third on the day of his birth

Tannice’s Covid-19 Birth Story

“Giving birth at home was something I’d wanted since after my first was born in 2016. Admittedly, when I was pregnant with my first, the idea of giving birth at home never even crossed my mind. As I was a “high risk” pregnancy, due to my high BMI, it was never even presented as an option.

My first labour was augmented with syntocinon – synthetic oxytocin – presumably because stress caused my contractions to slow down. After the shift change of midwives, I started to lose energy and momentum. I was also stressed by being prevented from eating (I had gestational diabetes and had thrown up my dinner from the night before after being a little too liberal with wonderful entonox).

I did all I was told during that labour – from having an epidural as a matter of course (in case my fat body couldn’t give birth naturally and I’d need a caesarean, they said) to readily agreeing to induction because of the gestational diabetes, I simply toed the line entirely.

Unfortunately “doing as you’re told” isn’t always the protective act you’d hope when it comes to labour and birth. It was not as beautiful an experience as I’d hoped. Whilst I narrowly avoided an emergency caesarean, I did beg for an episiotomy as I was so exhausted. I simply wanted it all to be over. Which wasn’t the way I’d imagined I’d feel about my daughter’s birth at all.

By the time I was pregnant with my second, however, the trauma of the first birth lent itself to my husband and I loving the idea of home birth.

Sadly, my second child was breech and I was taken to hospital gravely ill from a pulmonary embolism that kept me in the high dependency unit for about 10 days at 35 weeks’ pregnant. Now I’ve had my third child in a pool, at home, I realise that it would have been far tougher were I struggling to breathe, too. So I don’t regret the caesarean that I had with my middle child.

How safe is a home birth during a pandemic?

The environment for the birth of "baby A"
The environment for the birth of “baby A”

Many home birth services were suspended at the height of the first wave of the Coronavirus pandemic: the main reason being that paramedics were unable to provide category 1 (the highest emergency level) support for those giving birth at home. There were also concerns about sending midwives into a home setting with respect to distancing from other members of the household and the extended amount of time that the requisite two midwives would have to spend potentially exposed to Coronavirus in any asymptomatic but infected household. The viral load on those midwives was a consideration all hospital trusts had to factor in. 

However, there is no question that, when you purely look at the safety of a birthing dyad – mother and baby – it is quite clear that a home birth is safest for them. At a home birth you have just two midwives, the birthing person, the birth partner and any other members of the extended family, who can be asked to distance. This limits potential transmission to any of the family within the home. With Covid-19 restrictions on visiting, antenatal appointments, scans and attendance at birth (usually you must be in established labour – 6cm – before your chosen birth partner can join you) people having babies are struggling for support. 

Midwives do have policies designed to protect themselves and can of course wear as high a level of PPE as they think is prudent, but given they are in someone else’s home, they may feel uncomfortable insisting that, for example, the birth partner wears a mask or that other occupants of the home may not be present. This all serves to make the environment more tense and thereby will affect the birthing family’s experience. It’s essential, then, that the midwives attending feel comfortable doing so. Their hospital trust have a duty of care to them, too, at least under the Health and Safety Act 1974, if not just morally and ethically.

Tannice in her pool - So different from the hospital environment
So different from the hospital environment

What’s it like to have a home birth?

All in all, my home birth was a magical experience. I started having contractions as early as 22nd August but my son was not born until 11 September. We called out the midwives that first night and were close to calling several times again on various evenings until, on 10 September at around 8:30pm, the day after a stretch and sweep, my waters broke.

I was disheartened when the midwives decided that things were not progressing and that they would leave. I got back in my pool and was in a great deal of pain as the contractions continued. They came closer together and were even stronger than before so we called the midwives back a few hours later, after calling my parents to come and take care of our two older children. They were convinced there was a monster in the house after hearing my contraction-induced moaning!

Doubts

I was suddenly worried what would happen if I needed to transfer in for a repeat caesarean. Having previously been convinced it wouldn’t be necessary, I was suddenly struggling with the pain. After so long of having what’s called prodromal labour, I was exhausted from constant contractions and the anxiety around the increase in Covid cases across the country was making me suspect home birth could again be suspended.

That day I’d done an interview with local TV station, KMTV, talking about my fears about this very such problem.

The midwives returned with entonox and boy… was I glad to have it. So glad in fact that I blew through the remaining 1.5 tanks (I’d used half the first time they attended) and we were on. From waters breaking to Ares’ birth at 7:30am, the whole labour was 11 hours. The most primal and intensive experience of my life, his birth put me firmly in control of my environment and my body.

When I’d finally done all the work and he emerged, in my home, all I could shriek was “I did it!” and “I made him and I did it!”

I was truly elated and felt so very healed from the varied trauma of my first two births. I loved my body again and felt so connected to my own being that I felt the anxiety and historical grief melt away.

‘Advocating’ for the birth you want? It shouldn’t even be in our vocabulary

I had to advocate hard to get the birth I wanted. I had done so much research into home birth in preparation to birth my second child that I know everything I needed to about my rights and the NHS’ responsibilities to me under the law.

Of course, we hadn’t factored in the suspension of home births across the UK due to an unprecedented pandemic – but I did know the (small) risks involved when wanting a home birth after caesarean (HBAC). It wasn’t long after my first son was extracted from me that I began reading about HBAC. I carefully scoured the literature for all the factors involved in successful vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) to inform my decision to birth my last child at home. 

To sum up this weighty defence and advocation of birthing at home, the evidence is persuasive and significant. Historically, women have birthed in their own environment for far longer than they have within hospitals. Whilst I’m not against intervention, it’s hard to really know which interventions were truly necessary.

Birth Trauma Awareness Week

The medical profession will always, of course, err on the side of caution. But survival of mother and baby alone is not the only marker of a good birth. Ares was born during Birth Trauma Awareness week (7-13 September 2020). So many laid bare their traumatic experiences on social media that I felt almost guilty, despite my own history, that I’d had such a wonderful final birth.

We can have better births. We should never underestimate the importance of informed consent, personal choice, bodily autonomy and sovereignty. One shouldn’t need to know the system inside out to be able to get a good birth.

Once I had come down from the elation of my greatest birth of three, I realised something quite sad. I was celebrating not having been traumatised from the final birth I’ll ever have. Not to have been devastated by iatrogenic harm, discompassionate medical staff and a lack of postnatal care. I’d had a good birth. Sad really. It’s not much to ask for.”

Tannice and Baby Ares in the few hours after birth - a Covid-19 Birth Story
Tannice and baby Ares

Thanks Tannice for Sharing Your Covid-19 Birth Story!

And welcome to the world, baby Ares! Don’t forget, this is only an excerpt. You can read the full version of Tannice’s story, including links to articles for reference here.

Are you looking for a supportive community of like-minded people to discuss all things high BMI pregnancy? Pop along to our Facebook Group!

If you’d like to read more Birth Stories, you can find them here.

No excuse for COVID-19 review delay #BlackLivesMatter

The BigBirthas site has been reasonably quiet on subject of Covid-19. The situation is changing so rapidly, every time I find relevant research, it seems it is almost immediately contradicted. I don’t want to add to anyone’s confusion. But the news reported today by Sky that the review into affects on the BAME community is on hold because of protests is unacceptable. There is no excuse for COVID-19 review delay. #BlackLivesMatter.

Responding to the delay, shadow equality secretary Marsha De Cordova said: “BAME communities need answers.

There is a gross irony in delaying the release of a report into the unequal suffering of the BAME community, on the basis of global events that relate to the suffering of black communities around the world.

If anything, recent events make the release of this report all the more urgent. If the government is serious about tackling racial injustice, they should not be shying away from understanding into why these injustices exist.”

I can’t say it any clearer than that. To deliberately hold back this information because it might be politically sensitive beggars belief. It precisely shows why the #BlackLivesMatter movement is so important. People’s lives are not pawns in a political game. People need this information and they need it NOW.

There is no excuse for COVID-19 review delay. #BlackLivesMatter.

***EDIT***

The report has now been published. It’s underwhelming.

It doesn’t really offer much useful info for anyone who is concerned. It shows correlations between ethnicity, obesity and other factors with severity of COVID-19, etc. but nothing more than providing data on that which has already been widely observed. Nothing useful is offered in the way of advice.

If you like data, this study of 17million adult NHS patients is impressive, as with such huge numbers, they’ve been able to better adjust for confounding variables. It just hasn’t been formally released yet as it’s undergoing peer review at the moment:

https://opensafely.org/outputs/2020/05/covid-risk-factors/

Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

Are you pregnant or do you have a baby under 12 months? A new free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service funded by the NHS has just been launched!

The first phase is a two week trial for participants living in England. If successful, the plan is to roll it out nationwide. This could be so helpful even when the covid-19 crisis is over!

Being at home with a new baby can feel isolating enough at times, but now that the usual group sessions in the form of baby and toddler groups and baby cafés aren’t an option, this could be a really important way for new and expectant parents to feel supported.

You can register your interest by completing this short survey: https://bit.ly/3eN2rBI

The service is a joint initiative between Lactation Consultants of Great Britain, Peppy Parenthood, and the NCT. It is funded via the TechForce19 challenge. They urgently need 1,000 mums and dads of babies in their last trimester and under 12m to trial it.

Picture of a Dad looking at his phone with a nappied baby on his back. Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

It’s supported by NHSX (which I’d never heard of before!), the Department of Health and Social Care, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the AHSN Network.

What will this free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service look like?

The plan is to provide you with expert support on life with a baby; feeding, sleep, mental health, and more. You’ll have access to one-to-one chat support with expert practitioners and you can ask a question at any time. There will also be small personalised group chats, access to video consultations with breastfeeding and child sleep consultants, and online exercise sessions (which they promise will be safe, fun and effective!).

If the support proves to be helpful, there is the potential for national roll out.

Birth in a time of Covid-19

I think most people are a bit anxious right now. There’s a lot going on and a lot to get your head around. But if you’re pregnant, it must be especially worrying. Particularly if it’s your first and you already don’t know what to expect. Pregnancy and birth keeps you on your toes at the best of times, but birth in a time of Covid-19 comes with further considerations.

You can read the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice on coronavirus infection and pregnancy here.

We’ve had a couple of recent births in the BigBirthas Facebook Group. With permission, here’s a birth story from someone who just did it four days ago! Hopefully this will give a bit of information and reassurance on what to expect if you’re nearing your due date:

Kay’s birth story

I gave birth to my little legend on Friday 27th March.

newborn wearing a hat and clutching a finger -
birth in a time of Covid-19

I was induced at 37+5 due to obstetric cholestasis. (OC is a liver condition which affects 1 in 140 pregnancies in the UK. It is characterised by excessive itchiness, often on the palms of your hands and/or soles of your feet. A bit of itchiness in pregnancy is normal, particularly on a stretching tummy, but always worth getting checked out. – Big Birtha)

He came at 38+1. They kept me in hospital due being high risk with OC and high BMI and the midwives were absolutely amazing. They really put my mind at rest. The consultant and the anaesthetist were pushing for a c-section because of my size, but I rejected and carried on. I knew that I could do it.

In the end I managed all but the last hour without any pain relief at all and the last hour I allowed myself some gas and air. He was born at 2.10am on the 27th weighing 7lbs 14oz and is perfect.

My advice to everyone is to not let them put time pressure on you. If you choose a c-section, that of course is your choice and I am fully supportive, but I am so glad I didn’t let them hound me into one. The ward they put me on (postnatal) I was the only one that had a natural birth. It was so hard watching everyone else struggle even picking up their newborns, whereas I was up and walking about straight away.

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – Kay’s experience

They are taking the upmost care due to current situations, and I am generally a bit of a worrier. If you’re like me don’t let it get you down, I cannot express how safe they made me feel!

The midwifes were only allowed in that section of the hospital. Birthing partners were limited to one and had to take their own food etc. Once they were on the ward they couldn’t leave and come back again. It’s reduced the risk and made everyone feel more comfortable. We all washed so much too, mums, dads, and staff.

All in all it was a very positive experience, even in the circumstances.

Good luck everyone, from one very happy mumma. 💜

*****

Thanks for taking the time out to share that Kay, and congratulations!

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – highlights from the RCOG guidance

The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists is carefully monitoring all evidence as it’s released. So for up to date information, it is definitely best to read the advice on their page. The below is current as of 31st March 2020:

Generally, pregnant women do not appear to be more likely to be seriously unwell than other healthy adults if they develop the new coronavirus.

Based on the evidence we have so far, pregnant women are still no more likely to contract coronavirus than the general population.

What has driven the decisions made by officials to place pregnant women in the vulnerable category is caution.

It is expected the large majority of pregnant women will experience only mild or moderate cold/flu like symptoms.

If you think you may have symptoms of COVID-19 you should use the NHS 111 online service for information, or NHS 24 if in Scotland.

Our advice remains that if you feel your symptoms are worsening or if you are not getting better you should contact your maternity care team or use the NHS 111 online service / NHS 24 for further information and advice.

The most important thing to do is to follow government guidance [to reduce the risk of catching coronavirus].

It is really important that you continue to attend your scheduled routine care when you are well.

If you have any concerns, you will still be able to contact your maternity team but please note they may take longer to get back to you

There is a long FAQ section in the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice so it’s likely most questions you have may be covered there.

Stay safe, and look after yourselves.

x

Big Birtha