Patient and Public Engagement

Let’s talk about PPE. No, not *that* PPE, I’m talking about Patient and Public Engagement, also known as PPI – Patient and Public Involvement!

I’m pleased to announce that lately, organisations have been approaching BigBirthas to get involved in projects at the planning stage. This is great news!!

It is no longer acceptable (why was it ever?) for organisations; bosses, politicians, researchers, and healthcare professionals to make decisions about us, without us. People in positions of power, if you’re not asking about our lived experience, if you’re not listening to our stories, in whose name are you working? Are you really the experts here?

These sorts of scenes are just not acceptable:

Engaging with your audience (or representatives of it) at the outset has some very tangible benefits.

  • There’s a good chance that if you’ve overlooked something, service users will spot it. It’s our lives you’re talking about after all, and we’re literally the experts!
  • You can get the language right. You’re much less likely to draft something patronising, presumptuous, implausible, or antagonistic if it’s co-written/proofread by members of the intended audience.
  • You’ll understand what’s important to us; what floats our boat and what gets our goat. If your clients connect with what you’re saying, they’re more likely to listen. Honestly, if you want us to listen to you, it’s only reasonable that you hear us too!
  • Getting the language and tone right in documents encourages staff to do the same in their interactions.
  • Engaging with your audience at the earliest stages means you’re asking the right questions at the outset.

I’ve read so many hospital policies and research where it’s clear no representation was present at planning, drafting, or proofreading stage! It’s very easy for phrasing to become ‘us and them’, paternalistic, and ‘we know best’ in style when you’re external to the group in question. There are very few people for whom that approach yields the best engagement! Even worse, that language feeds into the psyche of those acting on your words.

How to find your audience

Therefore, if you want to do best by your clients, you need to get your audience involved, preferably as early as possible in the project. But how do you recruit your service users? If you’ve tried putting up posters and putting a link on your website and that’s not getting you anywhere, what next?

Reach out.

Former service users may have even more insight than current ones, but are less likely to see your invitation. If it’s too costly to contact previous service users directly, could you advertise in baby and toddler groups, with health visitors as well as maternity clinics? What about maternity voices partnerships?

Are the service users you do engage sufficiently representative of the diversity of your clients? Do you need to try thinking more out of the box to reach more of the people you should be speaking and listening to?

Have you considered why people aren’t engaging? Are you offering expenses or any incentive for people to give you their time and effort? Is it something super simple like the time you’re trying to connect? Avoid daytimes and particularly the school run, provide creche facilities, or reimbursement for childcare. For in person meetings, make sure parking is good and preferably free, and there are good public transport links.

Are you clear about what you’re asking/offering, and who the work will benefit?

If You Represent An Organisation

Big Birtha is always happy to give an opinion, and is on several advisory and oversight committees already. If you want more than one person’s input (you really should!) we have a BigBirthas Facebook Group of 300+ members, from which you could recruit participants. Or if you just want to ask a few general questions, and sound out some ideas we could facilitate a Q&A style open meeting and see what happens. We’re passionate about this stuff, and changing maternity services for the better, so you’re likely to get some great engagement!

Just get in touch via the Contact Big Birtha link. Explain what you’re up to and we can discuss how Big Birthas can get involved to help you make your next project as engaging as it can be, which is in all of our best interests.

How To Submit an FOI Request for Maternity BMI Policies

If you’re pregnant or trying to conceive, you might want to know how to submit an FOI request (Freedom of Information) to your local maternity providers. It’s worth finding out as much as possible about your likely treatment beforehand, and it’s pretty simple to do.

How to Submit an FOI Request

  1. Find out which NHS Trusts cover your local area

    Quickest way to do this is to use the postcode location service on the NHS website. This will list all the local services, sorted by distance. https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/Maternity-services/LocationSearch/1802

  2. Check out the Trust websites you’re interested in.

    Mostly clicking through to the individual pages will display the website at the top under the name, if not, just Google it.

  3. Find the page on Freedom of Information requests.

    There always is one. Easiest way is to type “FOI” into the search box, usually found somewhere near the top. Somewhere on that page will list the email address you need to send queries to.

  4. Send your questions/request for relevant policies to the FOI email address.

    If you don’t want to write your own, feel free to use/adapt mine:

    “I would like to know with regard to your fertility, maternity, childbirth and post-natal services:
    1. Do you have a policy for the management of larger women? If so, what is the BMI cut off (or other criteria) where this policy comes into use?
    2. Please attach a copy of the above policy.
    3. Please could you attach any other policies/guidelines/protocols relating to fertility, maternity, childbirth and post-natal which address the management of higher BMI women. This could include (but not be limited to):

    Inclusion/exclusion criteria for use of midwife led unit, hospital birthing pool, home birth, IVF etc.
    Glucose Tolerance Testing and Gestational Diabetes,
    Clexane prophylaxis
    Pre-Birth Anaesthetist referral
    Additional growth scans

    Digital copies/pdfs preferred.

    Kind regards”

  5. Wait for a response

    The authority must reply to you within 20 working days.

    Anyone has a right to request information from a public authority. For your request to be dealt with according to the Freedom of Information Act, you must:

    Contact the relevant authority directly
    Make the request in writing, for example in a letter or an email
    Give your real name; and
    Give an address to which the authority can reply (postal or email)

    You do not have to:
    Mention the Freedom of Information Act
    Say why you want the information

    They can charge you for the costs of sending the information, such as photocopying and postage if you request a copy by mail, but not if you request copies by email. They must let you know any cost beforehand.

    By law they must provide the information unless there is good reason not to; e.g. if in the interests of public safety or security to withhold the information or they do not record that information. See the Information Commissioner’s Office page for more info.

  6. Send the documents to Big Birthas for inclusion on the website!

    If you do get copies of your local policies, please contact me via the form on https://bigbirthas.co.uk/about-big-birtha/contact-big-birtha/ to let me know, and I’ll email back (stops me being inundated with spam!). Then you can send me the documents so I can add them/update them here for the benefit of all.

Help us with our research!!

Exciting news! For a few months now, I’ve been working with an organisation called Parenting Science Gang – we are a group of mums (there may be a few dads, but it’s mostly mums) doing research into what interests us – and we’ve got a special Big Birthas Parenting Science Gang Group.

We’ve discussed what research we’d like to see, researched what science and data is already out there, and we’ve interviewed other scientists to get their views on what we should research and how to go about it, and now we’re finally ready, have received ethics approval, have volunteers ready to send out, receive, and analyse questionnaires – all we need are a few individuals who fit the criteria we’ve set to answer our email questions!

Could you help us?

We need people who:

  • are over 18
  • have had 2 or more pregnancies where their BMI was over 29
  • whose youngest child is under 3
  • whose births took place in the UK
  • are happy to be interviewed by email about their experiences

If you can say yes to all three, please follow this link for more information and sign up here to be interviewed –

http://parentingsciencegang.org.uk/experiments/big-birthas-research/

your thoughts could really make a difference!

Research on Social Networks for Pregnant and New Mums!

Hi lovely peeps!

I’ve agreed to share this information about a research study that’s relevant to BigBirthas who are pregnant, or gave birth 6-12 months ago.

I’m not involved with developing the research, nor am I a participant – had my babies too long ago now! But I’m always interested to hear of new research involving bigger mums and plus-size pregnancies. Certainly this one is taking an interesting new line in the ‘weight management’ sphere, might be interesting!

There’s more info about the study on the University of Glasgow website:

Maternal obesity is a growing public health issue, with one in five pregnant women classified as obese in the UK. Interventions to date have had modest impact on clinical outcomes. These have mainly focused on individual behaviour change and have methodological limitations.

There is growing evidence on the importance of social networks for obesity-risk behaviours. There are few trials using social networks to reduce maternal obesity and very few qualitative studies exploring social network influences on weight management in pregnancy and postpartum.

As part of this PhD study, we will explore the role of social networks in the development and maintenance of obesity in pregnancy and postpartum. We will also review current evidence related to interventions to help women manage their weight during pregnancy and/or postpartum, and take learning from this to inform the development of an intervention. The study aims to:

  • Complete a systematic review to investigate available interventions using social networks for weight management in pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the weight management experiences and the influences of social networks of first-time pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the social networks of interview participants to try to understand how these might be used to help them in their weight management attempts

  • Develop initial ideas for a theory-based intervention to support weight related behaviour change for pregnant and postpartum women that are overweight or obese.

     

Advert 1