Sarah’s Homebirth Story

Many people who wouldn’t normally choose home birth are considering their options right now, due to covid-19 restrictions on birthing options. I’m a huge fan of birthing at home, having had my second baby in my lounge, but I appreciate it’s not for everyone! Hearing about other people’s experiences can be helpful to give you a feel of what it could be like. Of course, everyone’s experience is as unique as they are, but it’s so lovely when we hear positive stories in the Big Birthas Facebook group, and so I asked for permission to share this one with you. This is Sarah’s homebirth story.

Homebirth story - welcome Gabriel Leonard (pictured in a rainbow babygro)
Gabriel Leonard

Welcome to the world, Gabriel Leonard!

Just wanted to announce the arrival of our gorgeous 4th baby, Gabriel Leonard, born in a pool at home on Wednesday 15th July at 07.48am, surrounded by peace, quiet and love.

I am very much a larger lady with my bmi probably in the very high 40s (I refused to be weighed), I had gestational diabetes (GDM) for which I was on 2 500mg modified release metformin tablets. I also have a medical history of gall stones, diverticulitis, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). None of those things affect me and have just been found on scans over time rather than because of emergencies. I am otherwise fit and well and still perfectly mobile (something they like to presume is fat = immobile 🙄).

This birth was slightly different from my other 3. He was my latest to arrive (38+2, 39+1, 37+6) at 39 weeks and 2 days. To be perfectly honest I was losing faith in having a natural birth. When you have GDM the word induction gets thrown around a lot regardless of how well mum and baby are getting along 🙄.

The other things that made this birth different were the fact that in my other 3 births my waters had gone first, and then my contractions started a few hours later. With this baby I started off having some slightly uncomfortable cramp. That cramp then started coming and going and increasing in intensity. I called my homebirth team and they said someone would be with me within an hour.

Early stages

Husband set about getting the pool up and my mum (who lives with us) did a great job of herding the other wild animals (ie my other 3 😂). By the time the midwife arrived I was so uncomfortable but managing to own it by breathing through (seriously ladies, get hypnobirthing!). The midwife just sat there quietly letting me do my thing, not interfering or asking me to do anything at all.

I did start to have a little wobble, being unused to my labour starting before waters breaking, I thought I was probably only 3cm and thinking “Jesus, how do I make it through the rest!?” I asked for a vaginal examination as I needed to know in my own mind what I was dealing with. The midwife was fantastic and waited until in between contractions to assess me. I was 6cm!! Knowing this really helped give me the push to continue.

Time for gas and air…

The second midwife arrived with the good stuff (gas and air) and the pool was ready at last (which meant the husband got to live on for another day!). That amazing feeling when you get into that water is indescribable. Things felt like they really ramped up. Within a few moments of being in the pool my waters went which was such a strange sensation! Probably 5-10 mins later I could feel baby start to come.

I reached down and could feel his head (something I’d never done before). In the next 2 contractions his head was out and then in the next his full body. I lifted him out of the water and onto my chest. I don’t think I have ever felt more proud of myself in that moment.

The midwife asked for the pool to be topped up with hot water and occasionally wet the towel covering baby to keep him warm. The midwives said what an amazing and calm birth it was, I didn’t make a sound other than the grunty breath noise whilst my baby came out. (My husband said our toddler makes more noise whilst having a poo 😂😂). Placenta came away nice and easily.

Baby fed like an absolute pro. My husband eventually cut the cord and the midwife helped us tie our cord tie.

Reflections

It was the blissful birth I’ve needed. Baby was absolutely perfect and weighed in at 8lb 7oz.

I just wanted to say the homebirth team were sensational and never once did I hear “no”, “but”, “maybe”. From first visit they believed in me and my baby.

I also had a private midwife to do my antenatal and postnatal observations. She came a few hours after Gabriel arrived. She was so full of joy and happiness for us that we got the birth we needed. After doing the first set of bloods on baby (in GDM, blood sugars are done on newborns to ensure there isn’t hypoglycemia), she did a few other checks on us both, had some celebratory chocolate (it had been soooooo long without chocolate!) and left us to it.

My mum set about emptying the pool whilst the hubby child herded. I just sat there in my own living room in utter bliss eating toast and feeding my baby.

I did his second set of bloods which were also absolutely fine so no further bloods needed.

Still on a massive euphoric high.

So ladies listen to YOUR BODY, YOUR BABY. Do not accept no for an answer. There are still people in the profession that see beyond your weight and believe in you as a woman and as a mother. It’s taken me 4 babies to find that very special team of women.

Sarah pictured with newborn and toddler - homebirth story
Huge congratulations to Sarah!

Would you like to share your homebirth story? Or hospital birth story? Or wherever it happened to take place story?

We love hearing about births. Even if it didn’t go exactly as you hoped, or if all your plans went completely out the window! Huge congratulations to Sarah, and thanks so much for sharing your very special homebirth story. It just goes to show that GDM and other health conditions need not be a bar to homebirthing, if it’s what you would like.

Welcome to the world, Gabriel!

Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

Are you pregnant or do you have a baby under 12 months? A new free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service funded by the NHS has just been launched!

The first phase is a two week trial for participants living in England. If successful, the plan is to roll it out nationwide. This could be so helpful even when the covid-19 crisis is over!

Being at home with a new baby can feel isolating enough at times, but now that the usual group sessions in the form of baby and toddler groups and baby cafés aren’t an option, this could be a really important way for new and expectant parents to feel supported.

You can register your interest by completing this short survey: https://bit.ly/3eN2rBI

The service is a joint initiative between Lactation Consultants of Great Britain, Peppy Parenthood, and the NCT. It is funded via the TechForce19 challenge. They urgently need 1,000 mums and dads of babies in their last trimester and under 12m to trial it.

Picture of a Dad looking at his phone with a nappied baby on his back. Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

It’s supported by NHSX (which I’d never heard of before!), the Department of Health and Social Care, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the AHSN Network.

What will this free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service look like?

The plan is to provide you with expert support on life with a baby; feeding, sleep, mental health, and more. You’ll have access to one-to-one chat support with expert practitioners and you can ask a question at any time. There will also be small personalised group chats, access to video consultations with breastfeeding and child sleep consultants, and online exercise sessions (which they promise will be safe, fun and effective!).

If the support proves to be helpful, there is the potential for national roll out.

Birth in a time of Covid-19

I think most people are a bit anxious right now. There’s a lot going on and a lot to get your head around. But if you’re pregnant, it must be especially worrying. Particularly if it’s your first and you already don’t know what to expect. Pregnancy and birth keeps you on your toes at the best of times, but birth in a time of Covid-19 comes with further considerations.

You can read the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice on coronavirus infection and pregnancy here.

We’ve had a couple of recent births in the BigBirthas Facebook Group. With permission, here’s a birth story from someone who just did it four days ago! Hopefully this will give a bit of information and reassurance on what to expect if you’re nearing your due date:

Kay’s birth story

I gave birth to my little legend on Friday 27th March.

newborn wearing a hat and clutching a finger -
birth in a time of Covid-19

I was induced at 37+5 due to obstetric cholestasis. (OC is a liver condition which affects 1 in 140 pregnancies in the UK. It is characterised by excessive itchiness, often on the palms of your hands and/or soles of your feet. A bit of itchiness in pregnancy is normal, particularly on a stretching tummy, but always worth getting checked out. – Big Birtha)

He came at 38+1. They kept me in hospital due being high risk with OC and high BMI and the midwives were absolutely amazing. They really put my mind at rest. The consultant and the anaesthetist were pushing for a c-section because of my size, but I rejected and carried on. I knew that I could do it.

In the end I managed all but the last hour without any pain relief at all and the last hour I allowed myself some gas and air. He was born at 2.10am on the 27th weighing 7lbs 14oz and is perfect.

My advice to everyone is to not let them put time pressure on you. If you choose a c-section, that of course is your choice and I am fully supportive, but I am so glad I didn’t let them hound me into one. The ward they put me on (postnatal) I was the only one that had a natural birth. It was so hard watching everyone else struggle even picking up their newborns, whereas I was up and walking about straight away.

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – Kay’s experience

They are taking the upmost care due to current situations, and I am generally a bit of a worrier. If you’re like me don’t let it get you down, I cannot express how safe they made me feel!

The midwifes were only allowed in that section of the hospital. Birthing partners were limited to one and had to take their own food etc. Once they were on the ward they couldn’t leave and come back again. It’s reduced the risk and made everyone feel more comfortable. We all washed so much too, mums, dads, and staff.

All in all it was a very positive experience, even in the circumstances.

Good luck everyone, from one very happy mumma. 💜

*****

Thanks for taking the time out to share that Kay, and congratulations!

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – highlights from the RCOG guidance

The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists is carefully monitoring all evidence as it’s released. So for up to date information, it is definitely best to read the advice on their page. The below is current as of 31st March 2020:

Generally, pregnant women do not appear to be more likely to be seriously unwell than other healthy adults if they develop the new coronavirus.

Based on the evidence we have so far, pregnant women are still no more likely to contract coronavirus than the general population.

What has driven the decisions made by officials to place pregnant women in the vulnerable category is caution.

It is expected the large majority of pregnant women will experience only mild or moderate cold/flu like symptoms.

If you think you may have symptoms of COVID-19 you should use the NHS 111 online service for information, or NHS 24 if in Scotland.

Our advice remains that if you feel your symptoms are worsening or if you are not getting better you should contact your maternity care team or use the NHS 111 online service / NHS 24 for further information and advice.

The most important thing to do is to follow government guidance [to reduce the risk of catching coronavirus].

It is really important that you continue to attend your scheduled routine care when you are well.

If you have any concerns, you will still be able to contact your maternity team but please note they may take longer to get back to you

There is a long FAQ section in the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice so it’s likely most questions you have may be covered there.

Stay safe, and look after yourselves.

x

Big Birtha

Birth Confidence Summit

Do you have an urge to listen to BigBirthas.co.uk founder Amber Marshall talk about high BMI birth for 50 minutes? Surely you’re keen to marvel at how much I waggle my hands around when I talk (because it’s a LOT)!? Well, I’m pleased to tell you your wait is over! I recently took part in a free online Birth Confidence Summit, organised by Birth Confidence Mentor and founder of BirthEssence.co.uk Charlotte Kanyi.

Screenshot of Amber Marshall - founder of BigBirthas talking to Charlotte Kanyi of BirthEssence at the Birth Confidence Summit
Amber Marshall – founder of BigBirthas – talking to Charlotte Kanyi of BirthEssence

Charlotte has interviewed 27 ‘experts’ (her title, not mine) over Skype about many different aspects of birth. Talk titles include Healing from a traumatic birth, Exploring Induction Choices, Dropping the Nice Girl Conditioning – Make Birth Better (which links with) Visibility, Birth and freeing yourself from the Good Girl Archetype, Hypnobirthing for Confidence and more.

It’s a great idea and you can access all the talks for the bargain price of free!

I talk about why I set up the site, research, the difference between absolute and relative risk, looking positively at pregnancy vs the self-fulfilling prophecy, the media, blaming and scapegoating, and a bit about my two pregnancies and births and how I felt about them.

TL:DR?

In my interview I discuss how our bodies are designed for making and birthing babies. That we’re no longer in the minority and therefore shouldn’t be treated as ‘exceptional’ or ‘problematic’, in fact, we should have the same options as anyone else! Yes, carers should monitor the risks and act accordingly, but until something negative arises (and odds are it won’t) we should stay positive! Do your research and don’t expect your doctor to know everything about your personal circumstances and what is best for you. You decide, and you can use the BRAIN acronym to help you ask the right questions.

The Birth Confidence Summit Speakers

It’s a formidable line-up! There are some great speakers here:

Charlotte Kanyi, Confidence Mentor at BirthEssence

Natalie Meddings, Author, doula and birth yoga teacher

Debs Neiger, Independent midwife at Yorkshire Storks

Rebecca Schiller, Writer, Doula and Co Founder of BirthRights Charity

Alexia Leachman, Therapeutic Coach and Host of the award winning Fear Free ChildBirth Podcast

Kemi Johnson, Independent midwife,  KG Hypnobirthing Teacher and Positive Birth Movement Facilitator

Liz Stanford, Owner of the Calm Birth School of hypnobirthing

Clare Ford, Birth Coach and Master Reiki Healer at Beautiful Souls

Mandy Rees,   Pregnancy and Postnatal Yoga Teacher

Mars Lord, Award winning Doula, Doula Trainer at Abuela Doulas and Birth Activist

Phoebe Pallotti, Practicing Midwife and Associate Professor of Midwifery

Dr. Amali Lokugamage, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist and Author

Samantha Nolan-Smith, Writer, Feminist and Founder and CEO of The School of Visibility

Simone Surgeoner, Mother of four and Journey Practitioner

Jo Bolden, Mother of one and Co founder and professional dancer at One Dance Epic

Emma Svanberg, Clinical Psychologist specialising in pregnancy birth and parenting

Dr. Rebecca Moore, Clinical Psychotherapist in Birth Trauma

Naraya Naserian, Mother of two and Journey Practitioner

Zoe Challenor, Professional Singer and Co Founder of B’Opera and Mother of Two

Lorna Phillip, ​Doula and Mizan Therapist at Birmingham Doula

Jennie Harrison, Energy Healer, Mindset Coach and Birth Trauma Specialist

Joy Horner, Independent Midwife, and facilitator of Positive Birth Movement Group

Kati Edwards, KG Hypnobirthing instructor and Doula at Birth You in Love

Nicola Goodall, Author, Founder of Red Tent Doulas and director of Wysewoman Workshops

Maddie McMahon, Breast Feeding Counsellor, Doula and Doula Trainer at Developing Doulas

Rachel Elizabeth, Mother of four and Doula at Creative Birth

Take a look and big thanks to Charlotte for organising and facilitating!